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Odds and ends

  • printperson and geesepalace have safely arrived for a week's visit, although their landing was delayed by a manhole cover on the runway. The pilot had never encountered that complication before either.

  • As many other people already knew - but I did not - Charles Dickens was an avid amateur actor. The caption on a painting at the V&A of other people in Ben Jonson's Every Man in his Humour, a production that Dickens was also in, mentions this. It was hung amidst a whole collection of various actors playing various Shakespearean roles.

  • Words recently looked up: pargeting, fane

Comments

( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
ajodasso
Nov. 17th, 2009 11:41 pm (UTC)
What does pargeting mean?
owlfish
Nov. 17th, 2009 11:48 pm (UTC)
It's decorative plasterwork, especially on the outsides of buildings. Common in Suffolk and Norfolk according to its frequent use in describing towns in those counties in the Blue Guide.
sioneva
Nov. 18th, 2009 12:04 am (UTC)
Any kind of decorative plasterwork or a specific type?
del_c
Nov. 18th, 2009 12:49 am (UTC)
Richard Fortey, in The Hidden Landscape, puts pargeting in East Anglia down to geology: the chalklands have no good building stones, so even the poshest houses were made of wood and plaster, and they had to do something to pimp them up.
desperance
Nov. 18th, 2009 01:22 pm (UTC)
As many other people already knew - but I did not - Charles Dickens was an avid amateur actor. The caption on a painting at the V&A of other people in Ben Jonson's Every Man in his Humour, a production that Dickens was also in, mentions this.

When I was being shown around Knebworth by the latest iteration of the Bulwer-Lytton dynasty, right there on the main staircase the young sprig said "Oh, and of course, Charles Dickens acted here. Right here on the stairs, as it happens, this is where they did Every Man in his Humour..."
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )