?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

What do you think of when you see the words "blue food"?

Comments

( 48 comments — Leave a comment )
Page 1 of 3
<<[1] [2] [3] >>
the_lady_lily
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:23 pm (UTC)
...from the ocean? Although that's mainly to do with this book review this week.

Alternatively, blueberries in large, luscious piles.
sushidog
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:26 pm (UTC)
It's wrong. Blue food is wrong.
My immediate thought is of lurid blue-tinted cakes, and smurfs. There is blue cheese, but I don't like blue cheese (it's moldy!). Blueberries are purple ratehr than blue. The only real, edible blue food, as far as I'm concerned, is blue corn, which actually is blue.
steer
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:45 pm (UTC)
Some parrot fish are blue and quite tasty.
(no subject) - sushidog - Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:47 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - steer - Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:56 pm (UTC) - Expand
black_faery
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:28 pm (UTC)
The bread I made as a child with blue and green food colouring in, and the amusing reactions from my classmates :-D
coth
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:28 pm (UTC)
That blue food is poisonous and not to be eaten. Where did I get that? Peter Pan? Somewhere in children's fiction anyway.
cliosfolly
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:29 pm (UTC)
Percy Jackson! (From Rick Riordan's series Percy Jackson and the Olympians) -- Percy's mother makes blue foods as an ongoing in-joke between the two of them.
hungry_pixel
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:32 pm (UTC)
Currently I think of *this*. And that H. is wrong :-)

Photobucket

In general though, it depends on the food. It is a little weird in anything except a smartie or cake...
kekhmet
Feb. 3rd, 2010 03:35 pm (UTC)
That was the first thing I thought of too! (Blueberries came second)
tisiphone
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:32 pm (UTC)
My grandfather. He absolutely could not stand food that was unnaturally blue or green, and was convinced that it indicated arsenical poisoning. I think of him every time I frost a cupcake in blue.
rjw1
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:35 pm (UTC)
something not natural.

even though there are obvioulsy blue foods like blue cheese.
altariel
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:37 pm (UTC)
Mouldy bread.
strange_complex
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:37 pm (UTC)
I expect them to be followed by the word 'colouring' - i.e. I don't really think of 'blue food' as a category at all. I assume that if food is blue, it must have been coloured artificially. It also made me think briefly of pretend 'food' made by children out of plasticine.
sollersuk
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:42 pm (UTC)
The sort of thing we (i.e. middle class children) were never allowed to eat in the 1950s because there were no natural blue food colourings
celandineb
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:47 pm (UTC)
*blinks* Well, I made blue mashed potatoes once (food coloring). And there are blueberries.

But if I saw the phrase, I would probably think of food to be eaten when one is blue or depressed.
steer
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:49 pm (UTC)
Food which is sad. :(

Mackrel have an attractive blue-ish tint when fresh



As mentioned elsewhere parrot fish... also some grouper which are apparently tasty (never eaten one myself).

Bilberries? Not so often eaten any more.
easter
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:50 pm (UTC)
"Crap, better clean out the back of the fridge again..."
khalinche
Feb. 3rd, 2010 03:05 pm (UTC)
How I learnt the word 'eschew'
I think of a children's poem, possibly by Michael Rosen, called 'Have You Ever Tried Explaining...?'. It's lovely but I can only remember fragments, like ' Have you ever tried explaining a sundial to a bat?' and part of it is, 'have you ever thought of a tomato that is blue?/A blue tomato is a food I'd certainly eschew'. And it concludes with the line

And if you ever (succeeded), then please explain to me
Why it's always sunny in school-time, and rainy after tea

I also think of blue food being the archetypal Do Not Want, apart, obviously, from blueberries. And the example above makes me think of Bridget Jones making blue soup.

Page 1 of 3
<<[1] [2] [3] >>
( 48 comments — Leave a comment )