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Ice cream sandwiches

We started discussing ice cream sandwiches last night, apropos of the next Android OS. C. wasn't entirely sure what an ice cream sandwich even is.

Save me a potentially-fruitless trip to the grocery story, oh LJ: are ice cream sandwiches commercially available in the UK?

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Comments

nisaba
May. 16th, 2011 02:22 pm (UTC)
I've never been sure what one is either. It does conjure up an odd image though; I'm assuming bread that would go rapidly soggy isn't actually involved?
owlfish
May. 16th, 2011 02:24 pm (UTC)
They have a biscuit base and topping. Whether or not it goes soggy when melting depends on what kind of biscuit was used for the sandwiches. Cheap ones with chocolate biscuits like in bourbon creams tend to. More expensive ones with biscuits like a decent choc chip, generally will stay crunchy.
sollersuk
May. 16th, 2011 03:49 pm (UTC)
Definitely nothing like that!

I'm a bit puzzled about the crunchiness as generally speaking in my exprerience choc chip type biscuits get soggy quicker than bourbon cream type ones

Can you find any illustrations? I'm having problems visualising them. What size biscuit The kinds you mention are about 2" diameter or 1" by 2" and I just can't see the ice cream doing anything but dripping straight off.
owlfish
May. 16th, 2011 04:04 pm (UTC)
They come in lots of different dimensions in the US - lots of competing brands and styles in the ice cream sandwich market.

From Wikipedia, a photo of a classic cheap one. Lots of companies make them and they come in a wide range of flavors. I seem to recall there will occasionally be brand tie-ins, such as ones whose cookies are shaped like a currently-popular kid's tv character.

For the homemade-look, this list from 2008 of NYC's top 10 ice cream sandwiches has a good range of photos.
sollersuk
May. 16th, 2011 05:13 pm (UTC)
Absolutely nothing like them that I've ever seen. How do you stop the ice cream squudging out at the first bite? I think that's what killed the ice cream wafer eventually - even hard ice cream soon melts - and "oysters" don't have that problem.

The biscuits shown are also much bigger than normal for the UK outside of coffee shops.
tisiphone
May. 16th, 2011 09:41 pm (UTC)
You don't. It's part of the challenge.
sollersuk
May. 17th, 2011 06:53 am (UTC)
That does sound like a big part of why I suspect wafers dropped out of use. A "ladies'" size handkerchief was totally inadequate for getting ice cream off one's face and hands.
owlfish
May. 17th, 2011 10:11 am (UTC)
They are slightly different beasts, if I understand correctly. Here, the wafers were applied at the end. In an ice cream sandwich, they are applied at the beginning, wrapped up tightly and the whole thing refrozen as a more cohesive unit. The frozen cookies and bonding time help make it manageable.
sollersuk
May. 17th, 2011 10:55 am (UTC)
Ah, our procedure was completely different.

1. Place first wafer on surface.
2. Take small wrapped block of ice cream from freezer.
3. Unwrap and put on first wafer.
4. Place second wafer on top.
5. Hand to customer.