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Ice cream sandwiches

We started discussing ice cream sandwiches last night, apropos of the next Android OS. C. wasn't entirely sure what an ice cream sandwich even is.

Save me a potentially-fruitless trip to the grocery story, oh LJ: are ice cream sandwiches commercially available in the UK?

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drasecretcampus
May. 16th, 2011 02:53 pm (UTC)
I'm guessing as freezers became more standard? There was a definite shift from going outside to an ice cream van with a bowl, to a Walls block, to a tub and a scoop. I remember having those square cones, but I don't remember individual choc-ice size blocks at home. At school we sometimes got a cylinder of ice cream, like an arctic roll without the jam sponge.
sollersuk
May. 16th, 2011 03:04 pm (UTC)
We don't have the tradition of going out to the ice cream van with bowls*; only for cones (or, in the past, wafers!) and ice lollies, for individual eating on the spot. We went more or less straight to tubs, as soon as freezer compartments of fridges got big enough.

*Outside of restaurants we don't have a tradition of having ice cream with, say, fruit pie; it's normally custard. Ice cream eaten as a dessert is usually as fancy as possible and hopefully to everyone's taste. The only blocks were "Neapolitan", three bands of chocolate, vanilla and strawberry, and what you got in your dish was a chunk cut off the end of this, on its own.
drasecretcampus
May. 16th, 2011 03:13 pm (UTC)
I suspect ice cream was only on a Sunday in the summer, up to say 1975 (when we moved from West Bridgford), maybe 1977. Mostly it was (Coop, occasionally Bird's) custard, made from powder; if not custard then cream off the top of the milk. Someone would run out with a single bowl, and get a couple of servings of ice cream. Timing was clearly crucial.

I can remember someone refusing Neapolitan because he'd never had it before and therefore wouldn't like it. Otherwise it would have been tubs of vanilla or raspberry ripple, or long blocks from Walls, oddly yellow.
alextiefling
May. 16th, 2011 06:43 pm (UTC)
Ah yes - this reminds me of my confusion at Americans using 'a la mode' to mean 'with ice cream', after that particular way of serving apple pie.
sam_t
May. 17th, 2011 11:56 am (UTC)
I remember the long blocks of Walls' yellow that you sliced to serve, either with similarly-sized wafers or in a bowl with jelly. I don't remember Neapolitan ones, but then as I couldn't eat it I was probably studiously paying attention to my jelly-on-its own or ice-lolly so as not to want it too badly.