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Last, nursing

"Last May" was in...

2011
32(46.4%)
2012
37(53.6%)

"Nursing a (healthy) baby" refers to...

Looking after a baby, whether cuddling or feeding them.
19(21.8%)
Feeding a baby, by whatever means.
11(12.6%)
Breastfeeding a baby.
57(65.5%)

Tags:

Comments

moral_vacuum
Aug. 24th, 2012 05:10 pm (UTC)
Last May does indeed mean the May of the year before. Unless however it's June or later and you're talking about both the May of the year you are currently in AND the subsequent May.

If it's near the end of the year or early in the next year and you say "this may" it means next May. But if you say "this may" earlier than that, it will be assumed it is the May of the year you are currently in.

English is a superb language. Especially with cultural thingies thrown in too.

owlfish
Aug. 24th, 2012 05:11 pm (UTC)
Plus or minus six months would be okay then?
owlfish
Aug. 24th, 2012 05:13 pm (UTC)
Awkwardly, I think it will be exactly six months after the relevant month that this will be published. Hmm. I wonder if I could still a year in there with any subtleness to avoid the ambiguity.
moral_vacuum
Aug. 24th, 2012 05:16 pm (UTC)
One thing I've learned from the Civil Service is to never be unintentionally ambiguous. Whilst intentional ambiguity is a valuable skill!
owlfish
Aug. 24th, 2012 05:18 pm (UTC)
It's someone else's work, so I'm debating the merits of de-ambiguisation.

(I think I meant to write "slip" instead of "still" in that previous comment.)
del_c
Aug. 24th, 2012 05:24 pm (UTC)
Round my way, you can disambiguate by saying "this May coming" and "this May gone".
heleninwales
Aug. 25th, 2012 01:09 pm (UTC)
I agree with your disambiguation. Also agree with moral_vacuum that the length of time elapsed matters. Round about now (late August/Sept), "This May just gone," is starting to turn into "Last May".