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Silent alphabet

Phonics is the basis for a national exam in the UK assessing reading competency among the young; fail, and students are remedial readers, regardless of their actual competency in reading.

Thinking about the sounds letters make, I started to wonder if there are any letters of the alphabet which are *never* silent, or if the entire alphabet could be "said" by saying nothing at all....

I'm hardly the first person to try making an alphabet out of this online. I don't pronounce all the words the same as some of those who've tried this exercise, so am not convinced by those in brackets, although they're starting places. * mark words disagreed with by commenters.

A *logically
B thumb
C *chthonic, muscle
D *Wednesday, bridge
E are
F halfpenny
G thorough
H shepherd
I maize
J marijuana
K knight
L half
M mnemonic
N Autumn
O colonel
P receipt
Q lacquer
R [February]
S island
T subtle often
U tongue
V
W write
X faux
Y [mayor]
Z rendezvous

In short: the phonics alphabet *could* be largely pronounced through silence, with just a couple of letters left to say any other way....

Done with some insights from this site, this one and this one.

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Comments

marzapane
Sep. 13th, 2013 02:43 am (UTC)
I think what you are talking about is phonemic awareness-- the individual sounds letters can make. In terms of reading instruction (and presumably what British children are assessed on), phonics is the relationships between combinations of letters and sounds, so all your examples mentioned above would be instructive as to when a letter can be silent. Phonemic awareness and phonics are fundamental components of early reading instruction, but must be taught along with fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension skills.