June 24th, 2002

Fishy Circumstances

Little things

C. votes for us going on holiday to a country where I cannot speak the language.

The weather's been oppressively hot... especially since the air conditioning is inexplicably not on. It's a good thing rain is forecast for today, breezes and rain can only help cool things off. There's a lovely breeze coming in through the window.

Cranky Professor writes on talented Italian drivers and groups of schoolkids meeting the pope. Speaking of the pope, he'll be in town next month. At this rate, we may be in town then too. But the crowds will be immense.

Cory Doctorow comments on a counter-resolution the Canadian House of Commons passed asserting Alexander Graham Bell was the inventor of the telephone... contradicting the opinion recently passed by the US Congress asserting it was Antonio Meucci, an Italian American (about time, quoth the Italians).

Meanwhile, Dundee is putting up a monument to "the world's best known bad poet," William Topaz McGonagall, according to the BBC. I've never heard of him, but that doesn't mean a great deal.

Meanwhile, Lilo and Stitch proved a funny, decent movie. Good, except for the Disney-flaws you'd expect.

Goal: Finishing the last bits of the much overdue MA thesis, of course.
Fishy Circumstances

A readme file

On Corante's Blogging News, there's a note of a lovely Readme disclaimer appropriate to most weblogs. It all made good sense and made me think a bit, mostly about the fact that it made good sense. And anyways, I like looking at pretty shades of blue.

Update #1: I also took a look at the Blogger's Manifesto today. Like the readme, full of interesting, thought-provokingness. (If perhaps less serious)

And yes, I'd especially like to hear from long-lost friends like you, innostrantsa!

Update #2: The Manifesto link works now. Sorry about that.

Update #3: I can't figure out where I found the Manifesto link. Questions: is this one ancient or new? One author mentions it on June 17th. At least someone's taking it seriously:
[Error: Irreparable invalid markup ('<a [...] http://www.saltedwound.com/?p>') in entry. Owner must fix manually. Raw contents below.]

On <a href="http://www.corante.com/blogging/archives20020623.html#1847">Corante's Blogging News</a>, there's a note of a lovely <a href="http://www.namaii.com/readme/">Readme disclaimer</a> appropriate to most weblogs. It all made good sense and made me think a bit, mostly about the fact that it made good sense. And anyways, I like looking at pretty shades of blue.

Update #1: I also took a look at the <a href="http://bloggermanifesto.com/">Blogger's Manifesto</a> today. Like the readme, full of interesting, thought-provokingness. (If perhaps less serious)

And yes, I'd especially like to hear from long-lost friends like you, <lj user="innostrantsa">!

Update #2: The Manifesto link works now. Sorry about that.

Update #3: I can't figure out where I found the Manifesto link. Questions: is this one ancient or new? One author mentions it on <a href="http://www.benhammersley.com/archives/00000798.html"> June 17th</a>. At least someone's taking it seriously: <a href=""http://www.saltedwound.com/?p=803"">SaltedWound</a>., perhaps Of course, there are a slew of other manifestos. Anyways, doesn't much matter. (Even if irony does repeated go over my head if not clearly marked.)
Fishy Circumstances

EU trivia

According to a Reader's Digest poll, as discussed on the BBC, people from Poland know more trivia about the EU than people from countries which are actually a part of the EU. Denmark and Italy did second and third best respectively, but then I would hope that Italians would knew that Romano Prodi has the presidency of the EU Commission!

Update #1: You can take
[Error: Irreparable invalid markup ('<a [...] http://www.readersdigest.co.uk/magazine/euroquiz.htm"">') in entry. Owner must fix manually. Raw contents below.]

According to a Reader's Digest poll, as <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/world/europe/newsid_2062000/2062843.stm">discussed on the BBC</a>, people from Poland know more trivia about the EU than people from countries which are actually a part of the EU. Denmark and Italy did second and third best respectively, but then I would <b>hope</b> that Italians would knew that Romano Prodi has the presidency of the EU Commission!

Update #1: You can take <a href=""http://www.readersdigest.co.uk/magazine/euroquiz.htm"">this quiz</a> yourself, courtesy of the Reader's Digest UK web site. Thanks to <lj user="targaff"> for inquiring!

Update #2: I was wrong about Spain. Spain has the EU presidency now. Romano Prodi has the EU Commission Presidency. There's a difference. Also, you should be forewarned that, as of last time I looked, the Correct Answers incorrectly list Portugal as NOT being an EU country. It is an EU country. Norway, however, is not. See the <a href=""http://europa.eu.int/abc/governments/index_en.html"">EU web site</a> if you don't believe me.
Fishy Circumstances

So close, so far.

I'm finished editing the thesis! By rights, this should mean I really am done. But I just took a look at the thesis guidelines for submitting final copies... and I don't have a table of contents, an abstract, my formatting's not quite perfect... and so on. In other words, yes, I can finish it today, including all those little details. But no, I won't have it in at school, submitted and out of the way by 4pm. Oh well. But I'm still planning on making it really, truly done today in every other respect.
Fishy Circumstances

TV and strikes

And on other subjects, Happy Fun Pundit discusses the revelations which occured when Canadian specialty tv stations discovered just how few viewers they actually had. And the news wasn't good. But the commentary was amusing.

Meanwhile, on the subject of Canada, in Toronto, city workers are due to go on strike at any moment. The Toronto Star discusses. This will mean no garbage collection, no parks, no ferries to the islands, to name a few.