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On to Lunenburg

The coastline between Halifax and Lunenburg is absolutely lovely. If I hadn't been driving, I could have admired even more of it. Instead, we made a few stops along the way after a rather late start which allowed me to fit in an hour at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, quite a nice museum with some very striking works temporarily up for their Acadie Monde exhibit, in honor of the 400th anniversary of Acadians. One of the pieces in particular, a five minute video intercutting a country-ish song with a silent movie version of Evangeline, was particularly moving.*

Peggy's Cove is a highly touristed village, but it's entirely worth it for the barren, smooth expanses of marine rock which form the town's landscape. The waves crash with raw power against the shores. Wild roses cling to the rocks in abundance, as do the first collection of orchids I've ever seen in the wild. The lighthouse is the advertised highlight, and there is something wonderful about its petit white form perched on the smooth rocks, but it was secondary compared to the beauty of the landscape. The cove itself is narrow and secure, and very lovely, the town dipping down to it, with just enough room for a few boats. We both took a great many photos.

The road was slow, but that's because it was the scenic one, passing through hamlets and villages. We stopped briefly in Chester, a lovely place, but too cold and windy for the way we were then wrapped up. Somewhere along the route, clouds hung low over the road, almost fog. Most of the day was clear and blue, with a brisk sea wind blowing in. We had meant to stop in Mahone Bay, a nicely preened community with three photogenic churches clustered at its heart, but the afternoon was growing too late and I really wanted to just arrive by then.

Lunenburg is a Unesco world heritage site. It's pretty, but I don't yet know the story behind this particular designation. Dinner was at a friendly pub with good food and an impressive selection of drinks. (Signs on the walls advertised Growers, Okanagen, and Strongbow!) We missed the end of the Folk Music Festival by choice - much as the performers appealed, I need an early night for the first time in many days. And so I will.

* I didn't really know who the Acadians were before coming on this trip so I'll tell you in case you didn't know either: French settlers who were ensconced in Nova Scotia and environs before the British, and were then expulsed in 1755 when they wouldn't swear loyalty to the British crown. Many went to New Orleans, forming the core of Cajun community there. In 1764, the British began to allow the Acadians to return, but that diaspora a few centuries ago has still fundamentally shaped the Acadian experience. The whole thing was made famous in the mid-ninteenth century by Longfellow's poem "Evangeline".

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owlfish
Aug. 9th, 2004 06:38 pm (UTC)
I remember driving over the Gold River - we commented on how it wasn't obviously gold, but perhaps there's some on the bottom of the river - an obvious joke, but one which made the river memorable. We're off to the Annapolis Valley tomorrow, a fine opportunity to try the cider. Thank you for the recommendation!
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