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Gourmet Food and Wine Show: Getting there

Over the course of the last few months, I've increasingly realized that I really like reading about good food and restaurants, going to places which serve good food, and just generally pursuing things relating to this subject. Such a revelation was enlightening, fodder for a good hobby and lovely eating experiences. And so, inspired by my newly conscious pursuit, I thought it only fitting that I should check out the annual Toronto Gourmet Food and Wine show.

The event was held in the south building of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. I'd been to the north building of the complex for last year's Worldcon, but not the south one. The website recommended the skylink/skywalk from Union Station as the best approach. I took the streetcar down to the subway, passing traffic congestion at the Lakeview Lunch where they were filming for a movie, as they so often do there. This time, the movie was called Tilt and is due to be released in 2005 as a "major motion picture" about a high-stakes poker tournament in Las Vegas. Toronto, Las Vegas - what's the difference, really?

Then it was only a matter of going via the subway and the airport in order to make it to my destination.
The skylink between Union Station and the south building of the convention centre is the length of about a five minute's walk, up and down escalators, ramps, stairs, and down long, sunlit corridors, several stories high, scattered with benches and advertising, and generally reminiscent of an airport concourse. There were large groups of students congregating in the length of the spacious hallway, lots of people with luggage labeled YYZ (for the Toronto airport), the odd luggage handling machine, and general low-grade turmoil. Exactly the sort of thing one might expect in the greater expanses of the city's main train station.

I came to the top of an escalator and security stopped me. There was a major airport security checkpoint set up, several metal detectors to walk through, a luggage x-ray device or two, security guards, people waiting in line to be scanned with lots of luggage. The signs beyond the barrier indicated the way to Terminals A, B, C, and D. A girl waiting to have her luggage inspected.

The security guard directed me around security, around the cameras and the lights, the long way around to the rest of the skylink beyond the filming of CTV's 2005 movie Instant Star Down a corridor and down two stories, there was no line at all for the only-just-opened show. Down yet another two flights of escalators, I checked my coat and headed into the show.