S. Worthen (owlfish) wrote,
S. Worthen
owlfish

Medievalist weblogs

I've been irregularly following the growth of the weblog-based Medievalist not-really-a-community yet. The medievalists I've found have not, in turn, found very many themselves. One aspect of trying to figure out how to find them is that not all people who are working professionally on medieval subjects spend any time commenting on medieval content in their weblogs. There's a great deal else in the world to talk about, after all.

Many people began their weblogs with an entirely different agenda in mind (aliciam and sioneva, for example). Others like littleowl have a great deal else on their plate these days, even if at one point it was a major focus of their work. Still others, like myself and cliosfolly make relatively frequent reference to medieval content and sometimes even devote entire posts to the subject. The Cranky Professor tends to only post on subjects of personal experience from which can be extrapolated larger, more generally-applicable thoughts on academia. H.D. Miller focuses on all sorts of things, from politics to sports to academic commentary, but includes medievalist-oriented commentary and the sporadic personal-experience comment. Mind Numbing's weblog also has an broad scope. Further along the spectrum is Ideofact, who tends towards intensive, focused commentary on academic topics. The Digital Medievalist is purely an annotated list of medieval-related links and notes.

There are others I haven't read enough to really slot into my scale of greys, but I'll list them since they too are blogging medievalists, as least from what I hear: Cacciaguida, Caveat Lector, Glosses, Kross & Sweord, Old Oligarch, The Reader, and Wormtalk.

Part of what interests me in this subject is the various commentary I've irregularly encountered online evidencing a clear sense of superiority by some bloggers over diarists. More non-diarists use the
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I've been irregularly following the growth of the weblog-based Medievalist not-really-a-community yet. The medievalists I've found have not, in turn, found very many themselves. One aspect of trying to figure out how to find them is that not all people who are working professionally on medieval subjects spend any time commenting on medieval content in their weblogs. There's a great deal else in the world to talk about, after all.

Many people began their weblogs with an entirely different agenda in mind (<lj user="aliciam"> and <lj user="sioneva">, for example). Others like <lj user="littleowl "> have a great deal else on their plate these days, even if at one point it was a major focus of their work. Still others, like myself and <lj user="cliosfolly"> make relatively frequent reference to medieval content and sometimes even devote entire posts to the subject. <a href="http://crankyprofessor.blogspot.com/">The Cranky Professor</a> tends to only post on subjects of personal experience from which can be extrapolated larger, more generally-applicable thoughts on academia. <a href="http://travellingshoes.blogspot.com/">H.D. Miller</a> focuses on all sorts of things, from politics to sports to academic commentary, but includes medievalist-oriented commentary and the sporadic personal-experience comment. <a href="http://www.mind-numbing.com/">Mind Numbing</a>'s weblog also has an broad scope. Further along the spectrum is <a href="http://ideofact.blogspot.com">Ideofact</a>, who tends towards intensive, focused commentary on academic topics. <a href="http://www.digitalmedievalist.com/news/index.html">The Digital Medievalist</a> is purely an annotated list of medieval-related links and notes.

There are others I haven't read enough to really slot into my scale of greys, but I'll list them since they too are blogging medievalists, as least from what I hear: <a href="http://cacciaguida.blogspot.com/">Cacciaguida</a>, <a href="http://www.yarinareth.net/caveatlector/">Caveat Lector</a>, <a href="http://glosses.net/">Glosses</a>, <a href="http://kross&sweord.blogspot.com/">Kross & Sweord</a>, <a href="http://old-oligarch.blogspot.com/">Old Oligarch</a>, <a href="http://thereader.blogspot.com/">The Reader</a>, and <a href="http://wormtalk.blogspot.com/">Wormtalk</a>.

Part of what interests me in this subject is the various commentary I've irregularly encountered online evidencing a clear sense of superiority by some <i>bloggers</i> over <i>diarists</i>. More non-diarists use the <a href=""http://www.blogger.com"">blogger.com</a> service than the <a href=""http://www.livejournal.com"">livejournal.com</a> service, but really, when it comes down to it, you can use either equally for each purpose. The difference between "pure commentary" and "the daily life of a weblogger" is all down to shades of grey. Mind you, this elitist sentiment isn't an attitude I've particularly come across in any of the weblogs I am linking in this posting of weblogs by medievalists. (But if you want a relevant example, try <a href=""http://praiseofglory.com/blogs.htm"">here</a> or <a href=""http://www.lights.com/weblogs/directories.html"">here</a>, under 'globe'.) There seems to be a presumption among the unthinking that any weblog hosted by a service like Live Journal must automatically be of inferior content. I don't dispute that there are a great many fluffy LJ sites, but when it comes down to it, LJ is a service, and there are plenty of weblogs here with strong content. I'm more bemused by the phenomenon than anything else.

This entire post, by the way, was inspired by noticing that H.D. Miller has linked my weblog, but it's material I've been mulling over for a while now.

Update: I've run across another one, <a href=""http://www.mirabilis.ca"">Mirabilis</a>.
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