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With a side order of dessert

Inspired by rosamicula....

What is your accompaniament of choice for apple crumble? (If you could only choose one...)

Custard
22(33.3%)
Cream
9(13.6%)
Whipped Cream
3(4.5%)
Ice cream
27(40.9%)
Crème fraîche
3(4.5%)
Something else, which I will explain in a comment.
2(3.0%)

What is your accompaniament of choice for cake? (If you could only choose one...)

Custard
1(1.6%)
Cream
5(8.1%)
Whipped Cream
15(24.2%)
Ice cream
27(43.5%)
Crème fraîche
2(3.2%)
Something else, which I will explain in a comment.
12(19.4%)

Cake

What is it with British cake, which is so dry by design so as to require a dairy topping, even if it's otherwise really good? Cake should not have to require topping.
25(100.0%)

Comments

( 50 comments — Leave a comment )
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hobbitblue
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:08 pm (UTC)
I used to like custard on crumble but ice-cream is nicer and lets the crumble flavour through better. And cake doesn't need a topping, its cake! And decently made cake isn't dry at all...
haggisthesecond
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:08 pm (UTC)
I prefer nothing accompanying my cake or crumble. Nothing ticks me off like having my dessert arrive in an unwanted puddle of cream.
itsjustaname
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:11 pm (UTC)
Cake doesn't require a topping (it shouldn't anyway!), but a rich chocolate cake served warm with vanilla ice cream is pretty hard to beat!
tsutanai
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:18 pm (UTC)
Ice cream's also good on cake that's moist. XD But it should be optional, I'd think.

Edited at 2008-02-22 01:21 pm (UTC)
chamaeleoncat
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:24 pm (UTC)
I'm in the no-topping camp as well!
hawkida
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:30 pm (UTC)
Like they all said - cake by itself, not with any kind of sauce thing.
black_faery
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:34 pm (UTC)
Cake shouldn't require a topping - it should be slightly moist (great word!), not dry in the slightest.

Bought cakes are usually much worse IMHO.
sam_t
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:47 pm (UTC)
No, cake shouldn't require anything with it unless you're someone who eats Wensleydale with fruit cake, or it's the sort of sliced loaf cake that's supposed to be buttered. Spoonsful of cream are for puddings and (sometimes) scones. If it's dry by design, it should be so because it's supposed to contrast with a creamy or rich filling.

Have you discovered a run of particularly offensive cakes, or is it just that we have different standards for dryness? I suspect that it has been traditionally assumed that cakes will be accompanied by tea, or at least a drink of some sort.
larkvi
Feb. 22nd, 2008 05:35 pm (UTC)
I lived in St. Andrews for a year, and British cakes were, as owlfish suggests, generally much too dry. Not that North America always gets it right, as there are lots of places that sell dry cake here, but that is due to laziness/incompetence, whereas in my travels in Britain, it seemed by design--even places with wonderful examples of everything else would have dry cake.

This is, by the way, making me hungry for the scones sold in that little place on the way to Dollar, Scotland. . .
(no subject) - owlfish - Feb. 23rd, 2008 09:49 am (UTC) - Expand
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sioneva
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:51 pm (UTC)
Yes!! My husband eats cream with cheesecake...and dude, I make MOIST cheesecake!

I don't understand the British.
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sioneva
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:50 pm (UTC)
I like ice cream on apple crisp but crumble seems to require custard by virtue of its being British.

And British cakes ARE dry and dense in comparison with American cakes. It must be a cultural preference.
realtan_dannan
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:54 pm (UTC)
I don't put any diary topping on cake - however if it comes with a cream filling that's fine.
a_d_medievalist
Feb. 22nd, 2008 01:57 pm (UTC)
I'm mostly in the plain dessert camp, too. I do love custard on rhubarb crumble, though. And berries with cream or sabayon ... But my choices of sweet are almost always something with fruit OR some sort of creme brulée. Very dull, me.
owlfish
Feb. 23rd, 2008 09:51 am (UTC)
There is nothing dull about creme brulée.
justinsomnia
Feb. 22nd, 2008 02:01 pm (UTC)
I love whipped cream on anything ... except cake ... cake should just have lots of icing.
kukla_red
Feb. 22nd, 2008 02:05 pm (UTC)
The ice cream accompaniment for the aforesaid apple crumble should only be really good vanilla. You can see I've give this some thought.
pennski
Feb. 22nd, 2008 02:16 pm (UTC)
Well for me it has to be a non-dairy accompaniment to both, so I'd go for soya cream or soya custard with apple crumble and cake is either by itself or with chocolate sauce if chocolate-based cake.

And anyway, cake is supposed to be dry to give you an excuse to have another cup of tea with it at say 4pm! Gooey cake is a dessert and comes after a meal and may well be gateau instead. (provincial? Moi?)
owlfish
Feb. 23rd, 2008 09:52 am (UTC)
The whole drinks-with-cake justification only makes sense to me if you're dipping your tea in your cake (which seems very wrong) or dribbling tea over your cake (which seems merely odd, occasionally intentional by design, but very rarely).
(no subject) - pennski - Feb. 23rd, 2008 02:26 pm (UTC) - Expand
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( 50 comments — Leave a comment )