?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Christmas translations

New English words I learned this week, thanks to a misunderstanding at the local garden centre:

tinsel (UK) = garland (US)
lametta (UK) or angel hair (UK) = tinsel (US) or icicles (US)

Edited to add: "lametta" and "icicles" to post to make it more useful.

Comments

( 36 comments — Leave a comment )
steer
Dec. 12th, 2008 11:20 pm (UTC)
Uh? Angel hair?

Totally confused!

As far as I know, tinsel is the glittery stuff which hangs on strings like glittery plastic strands. Sort of like a very hairy catterpillar only glittery.

Garland would be like a wreath I guess.

Angel hair is a type of pasta and also, I think some kind of sea creature maybe.
owlfish
Dec. 12th, 2008 11:27 pm (UTC)
Oooh, so they're not English. They're C.-ish. Or possibly regional. Hmmm.

For me, a garland is a long thin thing - whatever it's made from - which is wrapped around trees or windowframes or mantelpieces for seasonal decor.

Edited at 2008-12-12 11:27 pm (UTC)
(no subject) - steer - Dec. 12th, 2008 11:28 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - owlfish - Dec. 12th, 2008 11:30 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - steer - Dec. 12th, 2008 11:40 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - owlfish - Dec. 12th, 2008 11:49 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - steer - Dec. 13th, 2008 12:00 am (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - seph_hazard - Dec. 13th, 2008 03:07 am (UTC) - Expand
owlfish
Dec. 12th, 2008 11:32 pm (UTC)
I wasn't reading your comment closely enough.

"tinsel is the glittery stuff which hangs on strings like glittery plastic strands. Sort of like a very hairy catterpillar only glittery."

The way you describe tinsel - that's a variety of garland, not tinsel in my world, although tinsel is used to make this kind of garland. So you and C. agree at least partially on what tinsel is.

For me, tinsel doesn't by default come pre-strung. It's finely cut strips, about a foot long each, of clingy plastic that can be dripped and dropped over individual limbs of a Christmas tree to make it sort-of look like it has fake icicles on it. Only very, very fake icicles.
(no subject) - steer - Dec. 12th, 2008 11:37 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - owlfish - Dec. 12th, 2008 11:43 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - steer - Dec. 13th, 2008 12:06 am (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - owlfish - Dec. 13th, 2008 10:08 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - miramon - Dec. 13th, 2008 10:32 am (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - owlfish - Dec. 13th, 2008 12:17 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - sollersuk - Dec. 13th, 2008 08:26 am (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - heleninwales - Dec. 14th, 2008 04:08 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - oursin - Dec. 13th, 2008 05:12 pm (UTC) - Expand
ewtikins
Dec. 13th, 2008 07:25 am (UTC)
Sort of like a very hairy catterpillar only glittery.

This is very close to my (Canadian) family's terminology for what in the UK is called tinsel. We also call it "that shiny stuff".

What in the US is called tinsel was also called tinsel in my family.

gillo
Dec. 12th, 2008 11:40 pm (UTC)
I certainly know the stuff as "Angel Hair" - the very fine strands of tinsel fabric or white stuff you strew across a Christmas tree.

You used to be able to get it at Woollies. :-(

hobbitblue
Dec. 12th, 2008 11:45 pm (UTC)
Agree on tinsel as shown in pic below, angel hair is fine white strandy stuff you put on tree to look like snow. And then there's lametta which is very fine strips of silvery stuff you pull apart to look sort of like icicles on the tree and they get *everywhere*. We don't do popcorn on string, but children make paper chains out of strips of paper curled over into loops..
owlfish
Dec. 13th, 2008 12:00 am (UTC)
Interesting, I'm struggling to find angel hair pictures.

Here's an ornament with it in it, but hard to tell from that exactly how it acts when not in glass.
(no subject) - hobbitblue - Dec. 13th, 2008 01:41 pm (UTC) - Expand
frostfox
Dec. 12th, 2008 11:46 pm (UTC)
owlfish
Dec. 12th, 2008 11:49 pm (UTC)
Do you call it lametta?
(no subject) - frostfox - Dec. 12th, 2008 11:54 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - bohemiancoast - Dec. 13th, 2008 12:35 am (UTC) - Expand
tisiphone
Dec. 12th, 2008 11:50 pm (UTC)
Oh, that's weird. My family uses the UK terms for both of those.
alysonwonderlan
Dec. 13th, 2008 04:04 am (UTC)
Also tinsel (US) sometimes = icicles. And I'm not sure where I got that term from, I thought I got it from my time living in England, but I could be completely off. Angel hair sounds familiar.
(Deleted comment)
(no subject) - alysonwonderlan - Dec. 13th, 2008 10:07 pm (UTC) - Expand
haggisthesecond
Dec. 13th, 2008 08:58 am (UTC)
In Canada when I was growing up we called the loose strands of shiny stuff that you would hang on the end of a bough icicles, and the long ropes you would twine around your tree tinsel.
(no subject) - alysonwonderlan - Dec. 13th, 2008 10:08 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - owlfish - Dec. 13th, 2008 10:16 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - alysonwonderlan - Dec. 14th, 2008 02:57 am (UTC) - Expand
a_d_medievalist
Dec. 13th, 2008 05:14 am (UTC)
I grew up in CA, and what you call garland, my family has always called tinsel. And what you call angel hair (I think) we always called icicles.
noncalorsedumor
Dec. 14th, 2008 03:01 am (UTC)
"Lametta" would have stumped me completely; "angel hair" would make me wonder why a garden center is stocking pasta.
( 36 comments — Leave a comment )